Darfur & Gaza: A Double Standard

The recent conflict between Israel and Hamas has created fury around the globe, especially in the Muslim world. A number of countries in the Middle East and North Africa saw some of the largest demonstrations in their history condemning the killing of civilians and children in the military operation.

Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, right, meets with Sudanese President Omar Al-Bashir at the Presidential Palace in Cairo, Egypt, Wednesday, March 25, 2009. Photo: AP

The Middle Eastern media, such as Al Jazeera, covered the confliclt 24/7.

One has to wonder why the Darfur conflict has never received similar attention.

Since 2003, Sudan's western province of Darfur has been the epicenter of a conflict between the mainly African rebels and the Arab-controlled government of Sudan and its proxy militias. RELATED Despite warrant, Egypt welcomes Sudanese president

As in Gaza, the civilians in Darfur are paying the highest price. It is estimated that over the past six years, about 200,000 have died from fighting, starvation and disease. The United Nations and aid agencies estimate that more than 2 million Darfurians, out of a population of about 6 million, are living in refugee camps.

Even in the grimmest moments in Darfur, in 2003 and 2004, when entire communities were brutally destroyed by the government forces and their militias, very few in the Arab and Muslim world protested the killings. To this day, not one Arab or Muslim leader has publicly criticized Sudan's actions in Darfur.

The recent conflict between Israel and Hamas has created fury around the globe, especially in the Muslim world. A number of countries in the Middle East and North Africa saw some of the largest demonstrations in their history condemning the killing of civilians and children in the military operation.

Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, right, meets with Sudanese President Omar Al-Bashir at the Presidential Palace in Cairo, Egypt, Wednesday, March 25, 2009. Photo: AP

The Middle Eastern media, such as Al Jazeera, covered the confliclt 24/7.

One has to wonder why the Darfur conflict has never received similar attention.

Since 2003, Sudan's western province of Darfur has been the epicenter of a conflict between the mainly African rebels and the Arab-controlled government of Sudan and its proxy militias. RELATED Despite warrant, Egypt welcomes Sudanese president

As in Gaza, the civilians in Darfur are paying the highest price. It is estimated that over the past six years, about 200,000 have died from fighting, starvation and disease. The United Nations and aid agencies estimate that more than 2 million Darfurians, out of a population of about 6 million, are living in refugee camps.

Even in the grimmest moments in Darfur, in 2003 and 2004, when entire communities were brutally destroyed by the government forces and their militias, very few in the Arab and Muslim world protested the killings. To this day, not one Arab or Muslim leader has publicly criticized Sudan's actions in Darfur.

The recent conflict between Israel and Hamas has created fury around the globe, especially in the Muslim world. A number of countries in the Middle East and North Africa saw some of the largest demonstrations in their history condemning the killing of civilians and children in the military operation.

Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, right, meets with Sudanese President Omar Al-Bashir at the Presidential Palace in Cairo, Egypt, Wednesday, March 25, 2009. Photo: AP

The Middle Eastern media, such as Al Jazeera, covered the confliclt 24/7.

One has to wonder why the Darfur conflict has never received similar attention.

Since 2003, Sudan's western province of Darfur has been the epicenter of a conflict between the mainly African rebels and the Arab-controlled government of Sudan and its proxy militias. RELATED Despite warrant, Egypt welcomes Sudanese president

As in Gaza, the civilians in Darfur are paying the highest price. It is estimated that over the past six years, about 200,000 have died from fighting, starvation and disease. The United Nations and aid agencies estimate that more than 2 million Darfurians, out of a population of about 6 million, are living in refugee camps.

Even in the grimmest moments in Darfur, in 2003 and 2004, when entire communities were brutally destroyed by the government forces and their militias, very few in the Arab and Muslim world protested the killings. To this day, not one Arab or Muslim leader has publicly criticized Sudan's actions in Darfur.

The recent conflict between Israel and Hamas has created fury around the globe, especially in the Muslim world. A number of countries in the Middle East and North Africa saw some of the largest demonstrations in their history condemning the killing of civilians and children in the military operation.

Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, right, meets with Sudanese President Omar Al-Bashir at the Presidential Palace in Cairo, Egypt, Wednesday, March 25, 2009. Photo: AP

The Middle Eastern media, such as Al Jazeera, covered the confliclt 24/7.

One has to wonder why the Darfur conflict has never received similar attention.

Since 2003, Sudan's western province of Darfur has been the epicenter of a conflict between the mainly African rebels and the Arab-controlled government of Sudan and its proxy militias. RELATED Despite warrant, Egypt welcomes Sudanese president

As in Gaza, the civilians in Darfur are paying the highest price. It is estimated that over the past six years, about 200,000 have died from fighting, starvation and disease. The United Nations and aid agencies estimate that more than 2 million Darfurians, out of a population of about 6 million, are living in refugee camps.

Even in the grimmest moments in Darfur, in 2003 and 2004, when entire communities were brutally destroyed by the government forces and their militias, very few in the Arab and Muslim world protested the killings. To this day, not one Arab or Muslim leader has publicly criticized Sudan's actions in Darfur.

The recent conflict between Israel and Hamas has created fury around the globe, especially in the Muslim world. A number of countries in the Middle East and North Africa saw some of the largest demonstrations in their history condemning the killing of civilians and children in the military operation.

Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, right, meets with Sudanese President Omar Al-Bashir at the Presidential Palace in Cairo, Egypt, Wednesday, March 25, 2009. Photo: AP

The Middle Eastern media, such as Al Jazeera, covered the confliclt 24/7.

One has to wonder why the Darfur conflict has never received similar attention.

Since 2003, Sudan's western province of Darfur has been the epicenter of a conflict between the mainly African rebels and the Arab-controlled government of Sudan and its proxy militias. RELATED Despite warrant, Egypt welcomes Sudanese president

As in Gaza, the civilians in Darfur are paying the highest price. It is estimated that over the past six years, about 200,000 have died from fighting, starvation and disease. The United Nations and aid agencies estimate that more than 2 million Darfurians, out of a population of about 6 million, are living in refugee camps.

Even in the grimmest moments in Darfur, in 2003 and 2004, when entire communities were brutally destroyed by the government forces and their militias, very few in the Arab and Muslim world protested the killings. To this day, not one Arab or Muslim leader has publicly criticized Sudan's actions in Darfur.

The recent conflict between Israel and Hamas has created fury around the globe, especially in the Muslim world. A number of countries in the Middle East and North Africa saw some of the largest demonstrations in their history condemning the killing of civilians and children in the military operation.

Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, right, meets with Sudanese President Omar Al-Bashir at the Presidential Palace in Cairo, Egypt, Wednesday, March 25, 2009. Photo: AP

The Middle Eastern media, such as Al Jazeera, covered the confliclt 24/7.

One has to wonder why the Darfur conflict has never received similar attention.

Since 2003, Sudan's western province of Darfur has been the epicenter of a conflict between the mainly African rebels and the Arab-controlled government of Sudan and its proxy militias. RELATED Despite warrant, Egypt welcomes Sudanese president

As in Gaza, the civilians in Darfur are paying the highest price. It is estimated that over the past six years, about 200,000 have died from fighting, starvation and disease. The United Nations and aid agencies estimate that more than 2 million Darfurians, out of a population of about 6 million, are living in refugee camps.

Even in the grimmest moments in Darfur, in 2003 and 2004, when entire communities were brutally destroyed by the government forces and their militias, very few in the Arab and Muslim world protested the killings. To this day, not one Arab or Muslim leader has publicly criticized Sudan's actions in Darfur.

The recent conflict between Israel and Hamas has created fury around the globe, especially in the Muslim world. A number of countries in the Middle East and North Africa saw some of the largest demonstrations in their history condemning the killing of civilians and children in the military operation.

Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, right, meets with Sudanese President Omar Al-Bashir at the Presidential Palace in Cairo, Egypt, Wednesday, March 25, 2009. Photo: AP

The Middle Eastern media, such as Al Jazeera, covered the confliclt 24/7.

One has to wonder why the Darfur conflict has never received similar attention.

Since 2003, Sudan's western province of Darfur has been the epicenter of a conflict between the mainly African rebels and the Arab-controlled government of Sudan and its proxy militias. RELATED Despite warrant, Egypt welcomes Sudanese president

As in Gaza, the civilians in Darfur are paying the highest price. It is estimated that over the past six years, about 200,000 have died from fighting, starvation and disease. The United Nations and aid agencies estimate that more than 2 million Darfurians, out of a population of about 6 million, are living in refugee camps.

Even in the grimmest moments in Darfur, in 2003 and 2004, when entire communities were brutally destroyed by the government forces and their militias, very few in the Arab and Muslim world protested the killings. To this day, not one Arab or Muslim leader has publicly criticized Sudan's actions in Darfur.

The recent conflict between Israel and Hamas has created fury around the globe, especially in the Muslim world. A number of countries in the Middle East and North Africa saw some of the largest demonstrations in their history condemning the killing of civilians and children in the military operation.

Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, right, meets with Sudanese President Omar Al-Bashir at the Presidential Palace in Cairo, Egypt, Wednesday, March 25, 2009. Photo: AP

The Middle Eastern media, such as Al Jazeera, covered the confliclt 24/7.

One has to wonder why the Darfur conflict has never received similar attention.

Since 2003, Sudan's western province of Darfur has been the epicenter of a conflict between the mainly African rebels and the Arab-controlled government of Sudan and its proxy militias. RELATED Despite warrant, Egypt welcomes Sudanese president

As in Gaza, the civilians in Darfur are paying the highest price. It is estimated that over the past six years, about 200,000 have died from fighting, starvation and disease. The United Nations and aid agencies estimate that more than 2 million Darfurians, out of a population of about 6 million, are living in refugee camps.

Even in the grimmest moments in Darfur, in 2003 and 2004, when entire communities were brutally destroyed by the government forces and their militias, very few in the Arab and Muslim world protested the killings. To this day, not one Arab or Muslim leader has publicly criticized Sudan's actions in Darfur.

The recent conflict between Israel and Hamas has created fury around the globe, especially in the Muslim world. A number of countries in the Middle East and North Africa saw some of the largest demonstrations in their history condemning the killing of civilians and children in the military operation.

Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, right, meets with Sudanese President Omar Al-Bashir at the Presidential Palace in Cairo, Egypt, Wednesday, March 25, 2009. Photo: AP

The Middle Eastern media, such as Al Jazeera, covered the confliclt 24/7.

One has to wonder why the Darfur conflict has never received similar attention.

Since 2003, Sudan's western province of Darfur has been the epicenter of a conflict between the mainly African rebels and the Arab-controlled government of Sudan and its proxy militias. RELATED Despite warrant, Egypt welcomes Sudanese president

As in Gaza, the civilians in Darfur are paying the highest price. It is estimated that over the past six years, about 200,000 have died from fighting, starvation and disease. The United Nations and aid agencies estimate that more than 2 million Darfurians, out of a population of about 6 million, are living in refugee camps.

Even in the grimmest moments in Darfur, in 2003 and 2004, when entire communities were brutally destroyed by the government forces and their militias, very few in the Arab and Muslim world protested the killings. To this day, not one Arab or Muslim leader has publicly criticized Sudan's actions in Darfur.

The recent conflict between Israel and Hamas has created fury around the globe, especially in the Muslim world. A number of countries in the Middle East and North Africa saw some of the largest demonstrations in their history condemning the killing of civilians and children in the military operation.

Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, right, meets with Sudanese President Omar Al-Bashir at the Presidential Palace in Cairo, Egypt, Wednesday, March 25, 2009. Photo: AP

The Middle Eastern media, such as Al Jazeera, covered the confliclt 24/7.

One has to wonder why the Darfur conflict has never received similar attention.

Since 2003, Sudan's western province of Darfur has been the epicenter of a conflict between the mainly African rebels and the Arab-controlled government of Sudan and its proxy militias. RELATED Despite warrant, Egypt welcomes Sudanese president

As in Gaza, the civilians in Darfur are paying the highest price. It is estimated that over the past six years, about 200,000 have died from fighting, starvation and disease. The United Nations and aid agencies estimate that more than 2 million Darfurians, out of a population of about 6 million, are living in refugee camps.

Even in the grimmest moments in Darfur, in 2003 and 2004, when entire communities were brutally destroyed by the government forces and their militias, very few in the Arab and Muslim world protested the killings. To this day, not one Arab or Muslim leader has publicly criticized Sudan's actions in Darfur.

The recent conflict between Israel and Hamas has created fury around the globe, especially in the Muslim world. A number of countries in the Middle East and North Africa saw some of the largest demonstrations in their history condemning the killing of civilians and children in the military operation.

Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, right, meets with Sudanese President Omar Al-Bashir at the Presidential Palace in Cairo, Egypt, Wednesday, March 25, 2009. Photo: AP

The Middle Eastern media, such as Al Jazeera, covered the confliclt 24/7.

One has to wonder why the Darfur conflict has never received similar attention.

Since 2003, Sudan's western province of Darfur has been the epicenter of a conflict between the mainly African rebels and the Arab-controlled government of Sudan and its proxy militias. RELATED Despite warrant, Egypt welcomes Sudanese president

As in Gaza, the civilians in Darfur are paying the highest price. It is estimated that over the past six years, about 200,000 have died from fighting, starvation and disease. The United Nations and aid agencies estimate that more than 2 million Darfurians, out of a population of about 6 million, are living in refugee camps.

Even in the grimmest moments in Darfur, in 2003 and 2004, when entire communities were brutally destroyed by the government forces and their militias, very few in the Arab and Muslim world protested the killings. To this day, not one Arab or Muslim leader has publicly criticized Sudan's actions in Darfur.

The recent conflict between Israel and Hamas has created fury around the globe, especially in the Muslim world. A number of countries in the Middle East and North Africa saw some of the largest demonstrations in their history condemning the killing of civilians and children in the military operation.

Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, right, meets with Sudanese President Omar Al-Bashir at the Presidential Palace in Cairo, Egypt, Wednesday, March 25, 2009. Photo: AP

The Middle Eastern media, such as Al Jazeera, covered the confliclt 24/7.

One has to wonder why the Darfur conflict has never received similar attention.

Since 2003, Sudan's western province of Darfur has been the epicenter of a conflict between the mainly African rebels and the Arab-controlled government of Sudan and its proxy militias. RELATED Despite warrant, Egypt welcomes Sudanese president

As in Gaza, the civilians in Darfur are paying the highest price. It is estimated that over the past six years, about 200,000 have died from fighting, starvation and disease. The United Nations and aid agencies estimate that more than 2 million Darfurians, out of a population of about 6 million, are living in refugee camps.

Even in the grimmest moments in Darfur, in 2003 and 2004, when entire communities were brutally destroyed by the government forces and their militias, very few in the Arab and Muslim world protested the killings. To this day, not one Arab or Muslim leader has publicly criticized Sudan's actions in Darfur.

The recent conflict between Israel and Hamas has created fury around the globe, especially in the Muslim world. A number of countries in the Middle East and North Africa saw some of the largest demonstrations in their history condemning the killing of civilians and children in the military operation.

Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, right, meets with Sudanese President Omar Al-Bashir at the Presidential Palace in Cairo, Egypt, Wednesday, March 25, 2009. Photo: AP

The Middle Eastern media, such as Al Jazeera, covered the confliclt 24/7.

One has to wonder why the Darfur conflict has never received similar attention.

Since 2003, Sudan's western province of Darfur has been the epicenter of a conflict between the mainly African rebels and the Arab-controlled government of Sudan and its proxy militias. RELATED Despite warrant, Egypt welcomes Sudanese president

As in Gaza, the civilians in Darfur are paying the highest price. It is estimated that over the past six years, about 200,000 have died from fighting, starvation and disease. The United Nations and aid agencies estimate that more than 2 million Darfurians, out of a population of about 6 million, are living in refugee camps.

Even in the grimmest moments in Darfur, in 2003 and 2004, when entire communities were brutally destroyed by the government forces and their militias, very few in the Arab and Muslim world protested the killings. To this day, not one Arab or Muslim leader has publicly criticized Sudan's actions in Darfur.

The recent conflict between Israel and Hamas has created fury around the globe, especially in the Muslim world. A number of countries in the Middle East and North Africa saw some of the largest demonstrations in their history condemning the killing of civilians and children in the military operation.

Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, right, meets with Sudanese President Omar Al-Bashir at the Presidential Palace in Cairo, Egypt, Wednesday, March 25, 2009. Photo: AP

The Middle Eastern media, such as Al Jazeera, covered the confliclt 24/7.

One has to wonder why the Darfur conflict has never received similar attention.

Since 2003, Sudan's western province of Darfur has been the epicenter of a conflict between the mainly African rebels and the Arab-controlled government of Sudan and its proxy militias. RELATED Despite warrant, Egypt welcomes Sudanese president

As in Gaza, the civilians in Darfur are paying the highest price. It is estimated that over the past six years, about 200,000 have died from fighting, starvation and disease. The United Nations and aid agencies estimate that more than 2 million Darfurians, out of a population of about 6 million, are living in refugee camps.

Even in the grimmest moments in Darfur, in 2003 and 2004, when entire communities were brutally destroyed by the government forces and their militias, very few in the Arab and Muslim world protested the killings. To this day, not one Arab or Muslim leader has publicly criticized Sudan's actions in Darfur.

The recent conflict between Israel and Hamas has created fury around the globe, especially in the Muslim world. A number of countries in the Middle East and North Africa saw some of the largest demonstrations in their history condemning the killing of civilians and children in the military operation.

Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, right, meets with Sudanese President Omar Al-Bashir at the Presidential Palace in Cairo, Egypt, Wednesday, March 25, 2009. Photo: AP

The Middle Eastern media, such as Al Jazeera, covered the confliclt 24/7.

One has to wonder why the Darfur conflict has never received similar attention.

Since 2003, Sudan's western province of Darfur has been the epicenter of a conflict between the mainly African rebels and the Arab-controlled government of Sudan and its proxy militias. RELATED Despite warrant, Egypt welcomes Sudanese president

As in Gaza, the civilians in Darfur are paying the highest price. It is estimated that over the past six years, about 200,000 have died from fighting, starvation and disease. The United Nations and aid agencies estimate that more than 2 million Darfurians, out of a population of about 6 million, are living in refugee camps.

Even in the grimmest moments in Darfur, in 2003 and 2004, when entire communities were brutally destroyed by the government forces and their militias, very few in the Arab and Muslim world protested the killings. To this day, not one Arab or Muslim leader has publicly criticized Sudan's actions in Darfur.

The recent conflict between Israel and Hamas has created fury around the globe, especially in the Muslim world. A number of countries in the Middle East and North Africa saw some of the largest demonstrations in their history condemning the killing of civilians and children in the military operation.

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