Netanyahu's Solid Coalition

In the Israeli political game, there are some things too important to play with. Has Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu safeguarded the country's security and foreign relations while meeting party and coalition needs, and what is the likely result of this new government's policies internationally?

Netanyahu had to put together a complex web of parties and personalities to get a Knesset majority. The result is a cabinet with more ministers than Jerusalem has rabbis.

Yet equally impressive is that of the 30 ministers, almost half of them will deal with some element of national security or foreign policy. Is this a formula for chaos? Possibly.

Avigdor Lieberman as foreign minister seems a recipe for disaster. The main problem is not so much his views but the world's perception in which he has replaced Netanyahu as the Western media's favorite "extremist hawkish racist warmonger ultranationalist." Funny, none of those terms are ever applied to Arab or Iranian leaders.

To some extent, this new demonized personality takes pressure off Netanyahu, who looks virtuous by comparison. Perhaps one day the world will even understand that he's a centrist.

The second problem is Lieberman's lack of experience - I refrain from making a comparison on this point with the current American president - and undiplomatic mien. The fact that his English is insufficient could be an advantage, as Foreign Ministry translators may sometimes be able to recast his words into safer form. He loves being controversial, not a good characteristic for a foreign minister.

In the Israeli political game, there are some things too important to play with. Has Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu safeguarded the country's security and foreign relations while meeting party and coalition needs, and what is the likely result of this new government's policies internationally?

Netanyahu had to put together a complex web of parties and personalities to get a Knesset majority. The result is a cabinet with more ministers than Jerusalem has rabbis.

Yet equally impressive is that of the 30 ministers, almost half of them will deal with some element of national security or foreign policy. Is this a formula for chaos? Possibly.

Avigdor Lieberman as foreign minister seems a recipe for disaster. The main problem is not so much his views but the world's perception in which he has replaced Netanyahu as the Western media's favorite "extremist hawkish racist warmonger ultranationalist." Funny, none of those terms are ever applied to Arab or Iranian leaders.

To some extent, this new demonized personality takes pressure off Netanyahu, who looks virtuous by comparison. Perhaps one day the world will even understand that he's a centrist.

The second problem is Lieberman's lack of experience - I refrain from making a comparison on this point with the current American president - and undiplomatic mien. The fact that his English is insufficient could be an advantage, as Foreign Ministry translators may sometimes be able to recast his words into safer form. He loves being controversial, not a good characteristic for a foreign minister.

In the Israeli political game, there are some things too important to play with. Has Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu safeguarded the country's security and foreign relations while meeting party and coalition needs, and what is the likely result of this new government's policies internationally?

Netanyahu had to put together a complex web of parties and personalities to get a Knesset majority. The result is a cabinet with more ministers than Jerusalem has rabbis.

Yet equally impressive is that of the 30 ministers, almost half of them will deal with some element of national security or foreign policy. Is this a formula for chaos? Possibly.

Avigdor Lieberman as foreign minister seems a recipe for disaster. The main problem is not so much his views but the world's perception in which he has replaced Netanyahu as the Western media's favorite "extremist hawkish racist warmonger ultranationalist." Funny, none of those terms are ever applied to Arab or Iranian leaders.

To some extent, this new demonized personality takes pressure off Netanyahu, who looks virtuous by comparison. Perhaps one day the world will even understand that he's a centrist.

The second problem is Lieberman's lack of experience - I refrain from making a comparison on this point with the current American president - and undiplomatic mien. The fact that his English is insufficient could be an advantage, as Foreign Ministry translators may sometimes be able to recast his words into safer form. He loves being controversial, not a good characteristic for a foreign minister.

In the Israeli political game, there are some things too important to play with. Has Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu safeguarded the country's security and foreign relations while meeting party and coalition needs, and what is the likely result of this new government's policies internationally?

Netanyahu had to put together a complex web of parties and personalities to get a Knesset majority. The result is a cabinet with more ministers than Jerusalem has rabbis.

Yet equally impressive is that of the 30 ministers, almost half of them will deal with some element of national security or foreign policy. Is this a formula for chaos? Possibly.

Avigdor Lieberman as foreign minister seems a recipe for disaster. The main problem is not so much his views but the world's perception in which he has replaced Netanyahu as the Western media's favorite "extremist hawkish racist warmonger ultranationalist." Funny, none of those terms are ever applied to Arab or Iranian leaders.

To some extent, this new demonized personality takes pressure off Netanyahu, who looks virtuous by comparison. Perhaps one day the world will even understand that he's a centrist.

The second problem is Lieberman's lack of experience - I refrain from making a comparison on this point with the current American president - and undiplomatic mien. The fact that his English is insufficient could be an advantage, as Foreign Ministry translators may sometimes be able to recast his words into safer form. He loves being controversial, not a good characteristic for a foreign minister.

In the Israeli political game, there are some things too important to play with. Has Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu safeguarded the country's security and foreign relations while meeting party and coalition needs, and what is the likely result of this new government's policies internationally?

Netanyahu had to put together a complex web of parties and personalities to get a Knesset majority. The result is a cabinet with more ministers than Jerusalem has rabbis.

Yet equally impressive is that of the 30 ministers, almost half of them will deal with some element of national security or foreign policy. Is this a formula for chaos? Possibly.

Avigdor Lieberman as foreign minister seems a recipe for disaster. The main problem is not so much his views but the world's perception in which he has replaced Netanyahu as the Western media's favorite "extremist hawkish racist warmonger ultranationalist." Funny, none of those terms are ever applied to Arab or Iranian leaders.

To some extent, this new demonized personality takes pressure off Netanyahu, who looks virtuous by comparison. Perhaps one day the world will even understand that he's a centrist.

The second problem is Lieberman's lack of experience - I refrain from making a comparison on this point with the current American president - and undiplomatic mien. The fact that his English is insufficient could be an advantage, as Foreign Ministry translators may sometimes be able to recast his words into safer form. He loves being controversial, not a good characteristic for a foreign minister.

In the Israeli political game, there are some things too important to play with. Has Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu safeguarded the country's security and foreign relations while meeting party and coalition needs, and what is the likely result of this new government's policies internationally?

Netanyahu had to put together a complex web of parties and personalities to get a Knesset majority. The result is a cabinet with more ministers than Jerusalem has rabbis.

Yet equally impressive is that of the 30 ministers, almost half of them will deal with some element of national security or foreign policy. Is this a formula for chaos? Possibly.

Avigdor Lieberman as foreign minister seems a recipe for disaster. The main problem is not so much his views but the world's perception in which he has replaced Netanyahu as the Western media's favorite "extremist hawkish racist warmonger ultranationalist." Funny, none of those terms are ever applied to Arab or Iranian leaders.

To some extent, this new demonized personality takes pressure off Netanyahu, who looks virtuous by comparison. Perhaps one day the world will even understand that he's a centrist.

The second problem is Lieberman's lack of experience - I refrain from making a comparison on this point with the current American president - and undiplomatic mien. The fact that his English is insufficient could be an advantage, as Foreign Ministry translators may sometimes be able to recast his words into safer form. He loves being controversial, not a good characteristic for a foreign minister.

In the Israeli political game, there are some things too important to play with. Has Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu safeguarded the country's security and foreign relations while meeting party and coalition needs, and what is the likely result of this new government's policies internationally?

Netanyahu had to put together a complex web of parties and personalities to get a Knesset majority. The result is a cabinet with more ministers than Jerusalem has rabbis.

Yet equally impressive is that of the 30 ministers, almost half of them will deal with some element of national security or foreign policy. Is this a formula for chaos? Possibly.

Avigdor Lieberman as foreign minister seems a recipe for disaster. The main problem is not so much his views but the world's perception in which he has replaced Netanyahu as the Western media's favorite "extremist hawkish racist warmonger ultranationalist." Funny, none of those terms are ever applied to Arab or Iranian leaders.

To some extent, this new demonized personality takes pressure off Netanyahu, who looks virtuous by comparison. Perhaps one day the world will even understand that he's a centrist.

The second problem is Lieberman's lack of experience - I refrain from making a comparison on this point with the current American president - and undiplomatic mien. The fact that his English is insufficient could be an advantage, as Foreign Ministry translators may sometimes be able to recast his words into safer form. He loves being controversial, not a good characteristic for a foreign minister.

In the Israeli political game, there are some things too important to play with. Has Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu safeguarded the country's security and foreign relations while meeting party and coalition needs, and what is the likely result of this new government's policies internationally?

Netanyahu had to put together a complex web of parties and personalities to get a Knesset majority. The result is a cabinet with more ministers than Jerusalem has rabbis.

Yet equally impressive is that of the 30 ministers, almost half of them will deal with some element of national security or foreign policy. Is this a formula for chaos? Possibly.

Avigdor Lieberman as foreign minister seems a recipe for disaster. The main problem is not so much his views but the world's perception in which he has replaced Netanyahu as the Western media's favorite "extremist hawkish racist warmonger ultranationalist." Funny, none of those terms are ever applied to Arab or Iranian leaders.

To some extent, this new demonized personality takes pressure off Netanyahu, who looks virtuous by comparison. Perhaps one day the world will even understand that he's a centrist.

The second problem is Lieberman's lack of experience - I refrain from making a comparison on this point with the current American president - and undiplomatic mien. The fact that his English is insufficient could be an advantage, as Foreign Ministry translators may sometimes be able to recast his words into safer form. He loves being controversial, not a good characteristic for a foreign minister.

In the Israeli political game, there are some things too important to play with. Has Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu safeguarded the country's security and foreign relations while meeting party and coalition needs, and what is the likely result of this new government's policies internationally?

Netanyahu had to put together a complex web of parties and personalities to get a Knesset majority. The result is a cabinet with more ministers than Jerusalem has rabbis.

Yet equally impressive is that of the 30 ministers, almost half of them will deal with some element of national security or foreign policy. Is this a formula for chaos? Possibly.

Avigdor Lieberman as foreign minister seems a recipe for disaster. The main problem is not so much his views but the world's perception in which he has replaced Netanyahu as the Western media's favorite "extremist hawkish racist warmonger ultranationalist." Funny, none of those terms are ever applied to Arab or Iranian leaders.

To some extent, this new demonized personality takes pressure off Netanyahu, who looks virtuous by comparison. Perhaps one day the world will even understand that he's a centrist.

The second problem is Lieberman's lack of experience - I refrain from making a comparison on this point with the current American president - and undiplomatic mien. The fact that his English is insufficient could be an advantage, as Foreign Ministry translators may sometimes be able to recast his words into safer form. He loves being controversial, not a good characteristic for a foreign minister.

In the Israeli political game, there are some things too important to play with. Has Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu safeguarded the country's security and foreign relations while meeting party and coalition needs, and what is the likely result of this new government's policies internationally?

Netanyahu had to put together a complex web of parties and personalities to get a Knesset majority. The result is a cabinet with more ministers than Jerusalem has rabbis.

Yet equally impressive is that of the 30 ministers, almost half of them will deal with some element of national security or foreign policy. Is this a formula for chaos? Possibly.

Avigdor Lieberman as foreign minister seems a recipe for disaster. The main problem is not so much his views but the world's perception in which he has replaced Netanyahu as the Western media's favorite "extremist hawkish racist warmonger ultranationalist." Funny, none of those terms are ever applied to Arab or Iranian leaders.

To some extent, this new demonized personality takes pressure off Netanyahu, who looks virtuous by comparison. Perhaps one day the world will even understand that he's a centrist.

The second problem is Lieberman's lack of experience - I refrain from making a comparison on this point with the current American president - and undiplomatic mien. The fact that his English is insufficient could be an advantage, as Foreign Ministry translators may sometimes be able to recast his words into safer form. He loves being controversial, not a good characteristic for a foreign minister.

In the Israeli political game, there are some things too important to play with. Has Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu safeguarded the country's security and foreign relations while meeting party and coalition needs, and what is the likely result of this new government's policies internationally?

Netanyahu had to put together a complex web of parties and personalities to get a Knesset majority. The result is a cabinet with more ministers than Jerusalem has rabbis.

Yet equally impressive is that of the 30 ministers, almost half of them will deal with some element of national security or foreign policy. Is this a formula for chaos? Possibly.

Avigdor Lieberman as foreign minister seems a recipe for disaster. The main problem is not so much his views but the world's perception in which he has replaced Netanyahu as the Western media's favorite "extremist hawkish racist warmonger ultranationalist." Funny, none of those terms are ever applied to Arab or Iranian leaders.

To some extent, this new demonized personality takes pressure off Netanyahu, who looks virtuous by comparison. Perhaps one day the world will even understand that he's a centrist.

The second problem is Lieberman's lack of experience - I refrain from making a comparison on this point with the current American president - and undiplomatic mien. The fact that his English is insufficient could be an advantage, as Foreign Ministry translators may sometimes be able to recast his words into safer form. He loves being controversial, not a good characteristic for a foreign minister.

In the Israeli political game, there are some things too important to play with. Has Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu safeguarded the country's security and foreign relations while meeting party and coalition needs, and what is the likely result of this new government's policies internationally?

Netanyahu had to put together a complex web of parties and personalities to get a Knesset majority. The result is a cabinet with more ministers than Jerusalem has rabbis.

Yet equally impressive is that of the 30 ministers, almost half of them will deal with some element of national security or foreign policy. Is this a formula for chaos? Possibly.

Avigdor Lieberman as foreign minister seems a recipe for disaster. The main problem is not so much his views but the world's perception in which he has replaced Netanyahu as the Western media's favorite "extremist hawkish racist warmonger ultranationalist." Funny, none of those terms are ever applied to Arab or Iranian leaders.

To some extent, this new demonized personality takes pressure off Netanyahu, who looks virtuous by comparison. Perhaps one day the world will even understand that he's a centrist.

The second problem is Lieberman's lack of experience - I refrain from making a comparison on this point with the current American president - and undiplomatic mien. The fact that his English is insufficient could be an advantage, as Foreign Ministry translators may sometimes be able to recast his words into safer form. He loves being controversial, not a good characteristic for a foreign minister.

In the Israeli political game, there are some things too important to play with. Has Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu safeguarded the country's security and foreign relations while meeting party and coalition needs, and what is the likely result of this new government's policies internationally?

Netanyahu had to put together a complex web of parties and personalities to get a Knesset majority. The result is a cabinet with more ministers than Jerusalem has rabbis.

Yet equally impressive is that of the 30 ministers, almost half of them will deal with some element of national security or foreign policy. Is this a formula for chaos? Possibly.

Avigdor Lieberman as foreign minister seems a recipe for disaster. The main problem is not so much his views but the world's perception in which he has replaced Netanyahu as the Western media's favorite "extremist hawkish racist warmonger ultranationalist." Funny, none of those terms are ever applied to Arab or Iranian leaders.

To some extent, this new demonized personality takes pressure off Netanyahu, who looks virtuous by comparison. Perhaps one day the world will even understand that he's a centrist.

The second problem is Lieberman's lack of experience - I refrain from making a comparison on this point with the current American president - and undiplomatic mien. The fact that his English is insufficient could be an advantage, as Foreign Ministry translators may sometimes be able to recast his words into safer form. He loves being controversial, not a good characteristic for a foreign minister.

In the Israeli political game, there are some things too important to play with. Has Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu safeguarded the country's security and foreign relations while meeting party and coalition needs, and what is the likely result of this new government's policies internationally?

Netanyahu had to put together a complex web of parties and personalities to get a Knesset majority. The result is a cabinet with more ministers than Jerusalem has rabbis.

Yet equally impressive is that of the 30 ministers, almost half of them will deal with some element of national security or foreign policy. Is this a formula for chaos? Possibly.

Avigdor Lieberman as foreign minister seems a recipe for disaster. The main problem is not so much his views but the world's perception in which he has replaced Netanyahu as the Western media's favorite "extremist hawkish racist warmonger ultranationalist." Funny, none of those terms are ever applied to Arab or Iranian leaders.

To some extent, this new demonized personality takes pressure off Netanyahu, who looks virtuous by comparison. Perhaps one day the world will even understand that he's a centrist.

The second problem is Lieberman's lack of experience - I refrain from making a comparison on this point with the current American president - and undiplomatic mien. The fact that his English is insufficient could be an advantage, as Foreign Ministry translators may sometimes be able to recast his words into safer form. He loves being controversial, not a good characteristic for a foreign minister.

In the Israeli political game, there are some things too important to play with. Has Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu safeguarded the country's security and foreign relations while meeting party and coalition needs, and what is the likely result of this new government's policies internationally?

Netanyahu had to put together a complex web of parties and personalities to get a Knesset majority. The result is a cabinet with more ministers than Jerusalem has rabbis.

Yet equally impressive is that of the 30 ministers, almost half of them will deal with some element of national security or foreign policy. Is this a formula for chaos? Possibly.

Avigdor Lieberman as foreign minister seems a recipe for disaster. The main problem is not so much his views but the world's perception in which he has replaced Netanyahu as the Western media's favorite "extremist hawkish racist warmonger ultranationalist." Funny, none of those terms are ever applied to Arab or Iranian leaders.

To some extent, this new demonized personality takes pressure off Netanyahu, who looks virtuous by comparison. Perhaps one day the world will even understand that he's a centrist.

The second problem is Lieberman's lack of experience - I refrain from making a comparison on this point with the current American president - and undiplomatic mien. The fact that his English is insufficient could be an advantage, as Foreign Ministry translators may sometimes be able to recast his words into safer form. He loves being controversial, not a good characteristic for a foreign minister.

In the Israeli political game, there are some things too important to play with. Has Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu safeguarded the country's security and foreign relations while meeting party and coalition needs, and what is the likely result of this new government's policies internationally?

Netanyahu had to put together a complex web of parties and personalities to get a Knesset majority. The result is a cabinet with more ministers than Jerusalem has rabbis.

Yet equally impressive is that of the 30 ministers, almost half of them will deal with some element of national security or foreign policy. Is this a formula for chaos? Possibly.

Avigdor Lieberman as foreign minister seems a recipe for disaster. The main problem is not so much his views but the world's perception in which he has replaced Netanyahu as the Western media's favorite "extremist hawkish racist warmonger ultranationalist." Funny, none of those terms are ever applied to Arab or Iranian leaders.

To some extent, this new demonized personality takes pressure off Netanyahu, who looks virtuous by comparison. Perhaps one day the world will even understand that he's a centrist.

The second problem is Lieberman's lack of experience - I refrain from making a comparison on this point with the current American president - and undiplomatic mien. The fact that his English is insufficient could be an advantage, as Foreign Ministry translators may sometimes be able to recast his words into safer form. He loves being controversial, not a good characteristic for a foreign minister.

In the Israeli political game, there are some things too important to play with. Has Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu safeguarded the country's security and foreign relations while meeting party and coalition needs, and what is the likely result of this new government's policies internationally?

Netanyahu had to put together a complex web of parties and personalities to get a Knesset majority. The result is a cabinet with more ministers than Jerusalem has rabbis.

Yet equally impressive is that of the 30 ministers, almost half of them will deal with some element of national security or foreign policy. Is this a formula for chaos? Possibly.

Avigdor Lieberman as foreign minister seems a recipe for disaster. The main problem is not so much his views but the world's perception in which he has replaced Netanyahu as the Western media's favorite "extremist hawkish racist warmonger ultranationalist." Funny, none of those terms are ever applied to Arab or Iranian leaders.

To some extent, this new demonized personality takes pressure off Netanyahu, who looks virtuous by comparison. Perhaps one day the world will even understand that he's a centrist.

The second problem is Lieberman's lack of experience - I refrain from making a comparison on this point with the current American president - and undiplomatic mien. The fact that his English is insufficient could be an advantage, as Foreign Ministry translators may sometimes be able to recast his words into safer form. He loves being controversial, not a good characteristic for a foreign minister.

In the Israeli political game, there are some things too important to play with. Has Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu safeguarded the country's security and foreign relations while meeting party and coalition needs, and what is the likely result of this new government's policies internationally?

Netanyahu had to put together a complex web of parties and personalities to get a Knesset majority. The result is a cabinet with more ministers than Jerusalem has rabbis.

Yet equally impressive is that of the 30 ministers, almost half of them will deal with some element of national security or foreign policy. Is this a formula for chaos? Possibly.

Avigdor Lieberman as foreign minister seems a recipe for disaster. The main problem is not so much his views but the world's perception in which he has replaced Netanyahu as the Western media's favorite "extremist hawkish racist warmonger ultranationalist." Funny, none of those terms are ever applied to Arab or Iranian leaders.

To some extent, this new demonized personality takes pressure off Netanyahu, who looks virtuous by comparison. Perhaps one day the world will even understand that he's a centrist.

The second problem is Lieberman's lack of experience - I refrain from making a comparison on this point with the current American president - and undiplomatic mien. The fact that his English is insufficient could be an advantage, as Foreign Ministry translators may sometimes be able to recast his words into safer form. He loves being controversial, not a good characteristic for a foreign minister.

In the Israeli political game, there are some things too important to play with. Has Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu safeguarded the country's security and foreign relations while meeting party and coalition needs, and what is the likely result of this new government's policies internationally?

Netanyahu had to put together a complex web of parties and personalities to get a Knesset majority. The result is a cabinet with more ministers than Jerusalem has rabbis.

Yet equally impressive is that of the 30 ministers, almost half of them will deal with some element of national security or foreign policy. Is this a formula for chaos? Possibly.

Avigdor Lieberman as foreign minister seems a recipe for disaster. The main problem is not so much his views but the world's perception in which he has replaced Netanyahu as the Western media's favorite "extremist hawkish racist warmonger ultranationalist." Funny, none of those terms are ever applied to Arab or Iranian leaders.

To some extent, this new demonized personality takes pressure off Netanyahu, who looks virtuous by comparison. Perhaps one day the world will even understand that he's a centrist.

The second problem is Lieberman's lack of experience - I refrain from making a comparison on this point with the current American president - and undiplomatic mien. The fact that his English is insufficient could be an advantage, as Foreign Ministry translators may sometimes be able to recast his words into safer form. He loves being controversial, not a good characteristic for a foreign minister.

In the Israeli political game, there are some things too important to play with. Has Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu safeguarded the country's security and foreign relations while meeting party and coalition needs, and what is the likely result of this new government's policies internationally?

Netanyahu had to put together a complex web of parties and personalities to get a Knesset majority. The result is a cabinet with more ministers than Jerusalem has rabbis.

Yet equally impressive is that of the 30 ministers, almost half of them will deal with some element of national security or foreign policy. Is this a formula for chaos? Possibly.

Avigdor Lieberman as foreign minister seems a recipe for disaster. The main problem is not so much his views but the world's perception in which he has replaced Netanyahu as the Western media's favorite "extremist hawkish racist warmonger ultranationalist." Funny, none of those terms are ever applied to Arab or Iranian leaders.

To some extent, this new demonized personality takes pressure off Netanyahu, who looks virtuous by comparison. Perhaps one day the world will even understand that he's a centrist.

The second problem is Lieberman's lack of experience - I refrain from making a comparison on this point with the current American president - and undiplomatic mien. The fact that his English is insufficient could be an advantage, as Foreign Ministry translators may sometimes be able to recast his words into safer form. He loves being controversial, not a good characteristic for a foreign minister.

In the Israeli political game, there are some things too important to play with. Has Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu safeguarded the country's security and foreign relations while meeting party and coalition needs, and what is the likely result of this new government's policies internationally?

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