November 12, 2009

How the U.S. Funds the Taliban

Aram Roston, The Nation

AP Photo

On October 29, 2001, while the Taliban's rule over Afghanistan was under assault, the regime's ambassador in Islamabad gave a chaotic press conference in front of several dozen reporters sitting on the grass. On the Taliban diplomat's right sat his interpreter, Ahmad Rateb Popal, a man with an imposing presence. Like the ambassador, Popal wore a black turban, and he had a huge bushy beard. He had a black patch over his right eye socket, a prosthetic left arm and a deformed right hand, the result of injuries from an explosives mishap during an old operation against the Soviets in Kabul.

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TAGGED: Afghanistan, Ahmad Rateb Popal, Taliban, ambassador , diplomat , interpreter , ISLAMABAD

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