March 3, 2010

Latin America Doesn't Care What the U.S. Thinks

Michael Shifter, Foreign Policy

AP Photo

As Hillary Clinton travels through Latin America this week, the U.S. secretary of state will find it profoundly transformed from the relatively serene and accommodating region she encountered as first lady in the 1990s. During that period between the end of the Cold War and the onset of the 21st century, Latin America lacked the political stirrings, fragmentation, and disarray that now define much of the landscape.

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TAGGED: Falkland Islands, Latin America, Venezuela, Brazil, Honduras, Colombia, Cuba, Chile, Uruguay, Hillary Clinton, Argentina, Barack Obama

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