October 25, 2010

Asia-Pacific Demographics & the Strategic Balance

AEI, American Enterprise Institute

AP Photo

Over the coming decades, the demographic profiles of the major powers of the Asia-Pacific region--China, India, Japan, Russia, and the U.S.--stand to be transformed significantly. Impending changes will directly affect the ability of these states to augment power and extend influence internationally. The strategic balance will be affected not just by changes in human numbers but by changes in human resource profiles (health and educational patterns) that bear on economic productivity and thus on military potential.

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TAGGED: Japan, Russia, China, United States, India, Asia-Pacific

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