November 15, 2010

Rare Earths Diplomacy

Policy Innovations, Policy Innovations

AP Photo

China ended its rare earths embargo of the West last week, with shipments resuming to Japan, the United States, and Europe after a speech by Secretary of State Clinton raised the diplomatic stakes. The ban ended as it began, quietly and without official notification. The question now is whether the resumption of trade will lull the developed world back into dependence, or whether the whole affair really was, as Clinton described, a "wake-up call."

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TAGGED: Resource Wars, Clinton, Europe, Japan, China, United States, Secretary of State

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