November 19, 2010

More to National Success than GDP

Mary Dejevsky, The Independent

AP Photo

In 1997 I experienced one of the sharpest cultural contrasts in the developed world by simple dint of crossing the Atlantic. I moved from Paris to Washington, from France to the United States, from a country supposedly quaking under the demands of modernity to one preening itself on being the richest and most powerful country in the world. In very many respects, my quality of life plummeted – this was not primarily to do with money, but to do with everything else.

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TAGGED: Washington, Paris, France, United States

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