April 4, 2011

Bombing By International Consensus

Brett Schaefer, National Review

AP Photo

In his speech last Monday, President Obama did manage to identify a few U.S. interests that could be threatened by the turmoil in Libya. But he placed far more emphasis on the moral case for action — our “responsibility to act.” And when he summarized his actions — consulting with other nations, pressing for U.N. Security Council resolutions that condemn Libya, imposing sanctions, and authorizing the use of force to protect civilians — notably missing was any effort to secure congressional approval.

Read Full Article ››

TAGGED: Obama, Libya, United States, President

RECOMMENDED ARTICLES

May 15, 2012
Grading Medvedev's Foreign Policy
Int'l Institute for Strategic Studies
The Duma's confirmation of Dmitry Medvedev as prime minister on 8 May, a day after Vladimir Putin's inauguration as president, marked the completion of their long-anticipated role swap and a new period in Russia's foreign... more ››
May 17, 2012
China's Old Power Structure Gives Way
Francesco Sisci, Asia Times
China and the United States were able to reach two agreements about the fate of the blind dissident lawyer Chen Guangcheng in less than 48 hours - a feat unthinkable in the era of consensus politics that started after Mao... more ››
May 18, 2012
U.S. Congress Must OK Military Intervention
Sen. Jim Webb, Daily Beast
The Obama administration exploited a constitutional loophole by taking action on its own during Libya's uprising. New legislation must end this defiance of the balance of power. more ››
May 15, 2012
Obama's Foreign Policy Failures
Gideon Rachman, Financial Times
President Barack Obama ran as the anti-George Bush candidate. So it is ironic that his signature achievement overseas - the killing of Osama bin Laden - is one Bush would have been proud of. more ››
May 16, 2012
NATO Should Be in the Dock over Libya
Seumas Milne, The Guardian
Liberia's Charles Taylor has been convicted of war crimes, so why not the western leaders who escalated Libya's killing? more ››