November 10, 2011

Philippines Roils South China Sea

Al Labita, Asia Times

AP Photo

 

MANILA - Tensions are rising again as China and the Philippines bump boats and trade diplomatic barbs over the contested Spratly Islands in the South China Sea. Adding fuel to the fire were recent "war games" staged by 3,000 American and Filipino marines near the hotly disputed maritime territory. 

 

The latest row was sparked by alleged intrusions into each other's claimed area in the potentially oil-and-gas rich chain of islands, where more than 50% of the world's merchant fleet tonnage passes each year. It also comes ahead of a crucial East Asian Summit meeting later this month in Bali, Indonesia where world leaders will be in attendance and the issue on the agenda

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TAGGED: China, South China Sea, Philippines

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