January 12, 2012

A Meeting of International Pariahs

Washington Post, Washington Post

AP Photo

Ecuadorian President Rafael Correa, an autocratic acolyte of Hugo Chavez who is usually and deservedly ignored outside of his own country, will get a little attention Thursday when he hosts Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad. As he basks in the aura of a more notorious international pariah, allow us to recount what Mr. Correa really ought to be known for: the most comprehensive and ruthless assault on free media underway in the Western Hemisphere.

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TAGGED: Iran, Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, Rafael Correa, Ecuador

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