April 17, 2012

Why Africa's Conflicts Never End

Jeffrey Gettleman, Foreign Policy

AP Photo

There is a very simple reason why some of Africa's bloodiest, most brutal wars never seem to end: They are not really wars. Not in the traditional sense, at least. The combatants don't have much of an ideology; they don't have clear goals. They couldn't care less about taking over capitals or major cities -- in fact, they prefer the deep bush, where it is far easier to commit crimes. Today's rebels seem especially uninterested in winning converts, content instead to steal other people's children, stick Kalashnikovs or axes in their hands, and make them do the killing. Look closely at some of the continent's most intractable conflicts, from the rebel-laden creeks of the Niger Delta to the inferno in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, and this is what you will find.

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TAGGED: Somalia, Kenya, Tanzania, Sudan, Zimbabwe, Robert Mugabe, Africa, Rwanda, Uganda, DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC of Congo, Joseph Kony, Lord's Resistance Army, Niger Delta, LRA

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