May 30, 2012

Can Arab World Develop Stable Governments?

Rami Khouri, Daily Star

AP Photo

Some would argue that in deeply tribal and sectarian societies such as those in many Arab countries, this sort of community-based, consensus-seeking system is more appropriate than a one-person, one-vote electoral democracy. The bad news is that none of these political options has succeeded yet in shaping a stable political system. The good news is that intense activity is under way in many Arab countries to develop political mechanisms that work, ending half a century of frozen national development that all in the region are pleased to leave behind.

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TAGGED: Arab Spring, Middle East, Arabs

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