July 3, 2012

German Dominance in Doubt After Summit Defeat

Der Spiegel, Der Spiegel

AP Photo

It was Monti, of all people, "Super Mario," as he's called in Berlin. The affable economics professor from Lombardy, the man the German Chancellery felt was the best thing that could have happened to Italy. The man who could "save Europe," at least according to Time magazine.

 

It was Monti, of all people, who dropped the bomb at 7 p.m. last Thursday.

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TAGGED: Eurozone, Mario Monti, Angela Merkel, Germany

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