July 29, 2012

In Cyprus, a New Generation Inherits Conflict

Christopher Torchia, Associated Press

AP Photo

In a strange twist, divided Cyprus has taken on a role meant to unify, this month assuming the rotating presidency of the European Union, a six-month stint that gives it a self-promotional platform even as it scrambles for a multi-billion dollar bailout to support its troubled banks. In another quirk of split-screen Cyprus, it is seeking money from oil-rich Russia, an increasingly important friend, in addition to the EU, as it tries to avoid the austerity measures that would likely come with any European aid.

 

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TAGGED: Turkey, Greece, Cyprus

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