July 29, 2012

In Europe, a Lull Between Blunders

George Jonas, National Post

AP Photo

It was Beijing in 2008; now it’s London. Social experiments have become Olympic sports. Many Canadians going to Europe this summer want to know if Europe has changed, and if so, how. (Yes: Notice I call London, Europe?) People ask me such questions sometimes because they think I’m from Europe. Of course, no one is from Europe. There's no such place, except in the sense that there’s a Mediterranean Basin or a Western Hemisphere. It's difficult even to be from Poland or Germany or Czechoslovakia because borders keep changing and countries change with them.

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TAGGED: Eurozone, France, Germany, Olympics, London Olympics, Europe

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