August 6, 2012

Afghanistan's Long Shadow over Syria

Shashank Joshi, Daily Telegraph

AP Photo

Proxy wars carry risks, and even those of us who are sympathetic to the rebel cause must recognise this. The shadow of Afghanistan, another country where Saudi Arabia and the United States cooperated to aid fragmented rebel forces, hangs over present-day Syria. Those efforts, labelled "ghost wars" by the journalist Steve Coll, succeeded in toppling a government, but also contributed to decades of instability, emboldened radical Islamist groups, and had consequences far beyond Afghanistan's borders.

Read Full Article ››

TAGGED: Saudi Arabia, Syria, Afghanistan

RECOMMENDED ARTICLES

August 3, 2012
The Great Islamist Comeback
Abe Greenwald, Commentary Magazine
On Tuesday, Defense Secretary Leon Panetta met with the new Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi in Cairo and declared, “It’s clear that Egypt, following the revolution, is committed to putting into place a democratic... more ››
August 5, 2012
In Afghanistan, Soccer or Civil War?
David Ignatius, Washington Post
This plan for Afghanistan’s first professional soccer league illustrates how the country has changed over the past decade, no matter what judgment you make about the U.S.-led counterinsurgency effort. Afghanistan is now... more ››
July 26, 2012
What I Learned from the Taliban
Anatol Lieven, Financial Times
My colleagues and I spoke with four people: two former members of the Taliban government (one of them a founder member of the movement), a senior former Mujahedin commander with close ties to the Taliban, and a non-official... more ››
August 1, 2012
The Taliban May Make Peace - Will the U.S.?
Ahmed Rashid, BBC News
The Taliban have been sending signals that they are ready to sit down with the US. But it seems as if the US is unwilling to act, particularly as the presidential election nears. more ››
July 25, 2012
Why Mali Is Not the Next Afghanistan
Gregory Mann, Foreign Policy
The proxy war is like a bank shot in a game of pool played with snowballs. It won't work in the Sahara or anywhere else, and surely even the most gung-ho American interventionists do not want to be holding the bag when Tuareg... more ››