August 30, 2012

Japan Still Won't Admit to 'Comfort Women' Scandal

JoongAng Daily, JoongAng Daily

AP Photo

In August 1993, Japanese Chief Cabinet Secretary Yohei Kono issued a formal statement on the issue of wartime “comfort women,” who were mostly recruited from Korea and forced into sexual slavery for the Japanese military during World War II. The statement admitted the practice had occurred and that it had “severely injured the honor and dignity of many women.” It also extended a “sincere apology and remorse” to those who suffered incurable physical and psychological wounds. However, the statement remains scorned and ignored by Japanese politicians today.

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TAGGED: Korea, Japan

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