September 9, 2012

Marikana Marks Rift in ANC Ideology

Vishwas Satgar, Mail and Guardian

AP Photo

On August 16 the Marikana massacre brought to the fore two forms of violence present in the everyday lives of workers. The first is an asymmetric violence expressed through the coercive capacity of the state: the hi-tech and militarised fire power of the police force. The second, less visible but shaping the lives of the workers, is the structural violence of financialised capitalism.

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TAGGED: Africa, ANC, South Africa, Marikana

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