September 14, 2012

Posturing over the Senkakus

Japan Times, Japan Times

AP Photo

China will surely step up its protest against the purchase of the islets. Japan should therefore make the utmost effort to communicate and fully explain to Beijing why it decided to purchase the islets. China, for its part, should refrain from taking retaliatory action. This would only worsen the situation and harm mutual benefits.

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TAGGED: Senkakus, Senkaku islands, China, Japan

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