October 17, 2012

Europe's Federalist Future

Steven Hill, Project Syndicate

AP Photo

A fragmented Europe composed of dozens of disconnected states, none with more than 7% of the population of China or India, would slowly lose its competitive advantages. Rather than fostering continental cooperation and development, countries would compete against each other – even more than they already do. A federalized Europe, with a population of 350-500 million people, is more likely to prosper – and thus maintain its citizens’ quality of life.

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TAGGED: European Central Bank, ECB, Mario Draghi, European Union, EU, Eurozone, Europe

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