October 26, 2012

Harper's Bridge to Nowhere (Detroit)

Terence Corcoran, National Post

AP Photo

During the June 15 photo-op at the Detroit-Windsor border, where Prime Minister Stephen Harper announced an agreement to put $1.5-billion into a new bridge across the Detroit River, the Prime Minister strolled boldly down the boardwalk. Was that a glint in his eye as he looked out over the river that will be crossed by the new bridge — the glint of a conqueror who had extracted a formal surrender from a foreign power, in this case the governor of the state of Michigan?

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TAGGED: Stephen Harper, Windsor, Detroit, Michigan, United States, Canada

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