October 26, 2012

Remote U.S. Base at Core of Secret Operations

Craig Whitlock, Washington Post

AP Photo

Camp Lemonnier, a sun-baked Third World outpost established by the French Foreign Legion, began as a temporary staging ground for U.S. Marines looking for a foothold in the region a decade ago. Over the past two years, the U.S. military has clandestinely transformed it into the busiest Predator drone base outside the Afghan war zone, a model for fighting a new generation of terrorist groups.

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TAGGED: Camp Lemonnier, Barack Obama, al-Qaeda, Drones, Yemen, Somalia, Africa, Djibouti, United States

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