November 11, 2012

How I Was Drawn into the Cult of Petraeus

Spencer Ackerman, Wired

AP Photo

Like many in the press, nearly every national politician, and lots of members of Petraeus’ brain trust over the years, I played a role in the creation of the legend around David Petraeus. Yes, Paula Broadwell wrote the ultimate Petraeus hagiography, the now-unfortunately titled All In. But she was hardly alone. (Except maybe for the sleeping-with-Petraeus part.) The biggest irony surrounding Petraeus’ unexpected downfall is that he became a casualty of the very publicity machine he cultivated to portray him as superhuman. I have some insight into how that machine worked.

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TAGGED: Paula Broadwell, United States, David Petraeus, Afghanistan, Iraq

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