November 13, 2012

In Cairo, a Curfew Against Chaos

Issandr El Amrani, Latitude

AP Photo

There aren’t many advantages to living in this city. It is falling apart under the weight of overpopulation, traffic is gridlocked, the pollution is toxic, and there are few parks or other green areas in which to seek respite. But residents will proudly say that there are few cities that offer Cairo’s oddly laid-back buzz.

Part of the city’s charm is that it is a genuinely 24-hour place: Cairenes think nothing of visiting a doctor at 11 p.m., shopping for shoes at midnight and having tea and a shisha at 3 a.m.

Read Full Article ››

TAGGED: Egypt, CAIRO

RECOMMENDED ARTICLES

November 11, 2012
Mideast May Consume Obama's 2nd Term
Patrick Cockburn, Independent
Obama wasn't challenged over America's plans in Syria and Iran in the election. But conflicts in the region could proliferate in his second term. more ››
November 11, 2012
World Should Prepare for More (New) America
Doug Saunders, G&M
The old America of force may have vanished from the scene. But people around the world would like to have a piece of this new America, the one that seems to be solving its problems. If Mr. Obama can sell it, the world is ready to... more ››
November 12, 2012
What Israel Could Teach Egypt
Janice Gross Stein, Globe and Mail
In the wake of the Arab Spring, Tunisia and Egypt are in the very early stages of constructing theocratic democracies – that is, governments that balance official religions with democratic institutions and pluralist... more ››
November 13, 2012
Salafists & Brotherhood: Best of Frienemies
Hussein Ibish, NOW Lebanon
Muslim Brotherhood-style Islamists and Salafists in contemporary Arab politics can only be described as "frienemies." In its more nuanced form, this word describes the relationship of those who are simultaneously, for different... more ››
November 13, 2012
The Brotherhood's Egypt
Daniel Pipes & Cynthia Farahat, National Review
Earlier this year, most analysts in Egypt assessed Field Marshall Hussein Tantawi as the key figure in that country’s politics and President Mohamed Morsi as a lightweight, so it came as a surprise when Morsi fired Tantawi... more ››