December 12, 2012

From One Egyptian Autocracy to Another

Michael Bell, Globe and Mail

AP Photo

The crisis confronting Egypt shouldn't have been unexpected. As thousands of opponents and supporters of the country's Islamist President continue to stage rival rallies ahead of a nationwide referendum on a draft constitution, the prognosis is at best uncertain, even with the strong Egyptian sense of national identity and a military seemingly committed to the concept of robust service to the nation rather than loyalty to a political movement.

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TAGGED: Mohammed Morsi, Egypt

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