December 13, 2012

Asia Is Primed for War

Victor Cha, Foreign Policy

AP Photo

In 1993, a series of journal articles written by mainstream international relations scholars in the United States claimed that Asia would be ripe for rivalry: A combination of nationalism, power rivalries, historical animosity, arms buildups, and energy needs, they argued, would lead Asia to become the next conflict hotspot. For instance, Aaron Friedberg, an international relations scholar at Princeton, wrote, "While civil wars and ethnic strife will continue for some time to smolder along Europe's peripheries, in the long run it is Asia that seems far more likely to be the cockpit of great power conflict." Instead, the region became the engine of world growth, home to an economic boom that has lifted millions out of poverty and shaken up the global balance of power.

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TAGGED: South China Sea, Senkakus, China, Asia

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