December 18, 2012

Muslim Brothers vs. the Liberal Street

Mike Giglio, Newsweek

AP Photo

As demonstrators massed outside Cairo’s presidential palace last week, 20-year-old Mohamed Shawky—a veteran of Egypt’s revolution with scars to prove it—was caught up in an angry crowd, pressed against a tall concrete barrier erected by authorities to control the mob. Like thousands of others, Shawky was protesting the country’s proposed new constitution. His answer was vague when asked what specific part of the document angered him. “The whole thing,” he said, “from A to Z.” Pressed, he eventually revealed why he was against the draft charter: “Because the Muslim Brotherhood made it.”

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TAGGED: Muslim Brotherhood, Egypt

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