December 28, 2012

Secularists Must Be Pragmatic to Save Egypt

Matt Fisher, National Post

AP Photo

The political opposition in Egypt has many fans in the West as a result of its principled stance against the pro-Islamist constitution, backed by President Mohammed Morsi of the Muslim Brotherhood. It’s because of what that document says or does not not say about the rights of women, Coptic Christians and free speech. Nevertheless, Egyptians have now voted several times since Hosni Mubarak was ousted from the presidency nearly two years ago. Every ballot has resulted in a decisive victory for the Islamists. Each time out they have received between 64 and 70% of the vote.

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TAGGED: Egypt

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