January 2, 2013

Why Russia Won't Help on Syria

Samuel Charap, New York Times

AP Photo

Many people in the Russian foreign-policy establishment believe that the string of U.S.-led interventions that resulted in regime change since the end of the Cold War — in Kosovo, Afghanistan, Iraq and Libya — are a threat to the stability of the international system and potentially to “regime stability” in Russia itself. Russia did not give its imprimatur to these interventions, and will never do so if it suspects the motive is removal of a sitting government.

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TAGGED: Middle East, Syria, Russia

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