January 8, 2013

The Open Question of Afghanistan

Walter Pincus, Washington Post

AP Photo

President Obama this week has a chance to explain to President Hamid Karzai, and hopefully to the American people, what will be our future role in Afghanistan. Most speculation has focused on how rapidly the remaining 60,000-plus U.S. combat troops will be withdrawn and how many will be permanently assigned there after 2014. But as the U.S. financial belt is being tightened, people want to know the financial cost, for how long and what will be accomplished.

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TAGGED: Barack Obama, United States, Afghanistan, Hamid Karzai

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