January 13, 2013

Trail of Bullets Links Iran to African Wars

C.J. Chivers, New York Times

AP Photo

The trail of evidence uncovered by the investigation included Iranian cartridges in the possession of rebels in Ivory Coast, federal troops in the Democratic Republic of Congo, the Taliban in Afghanistan and groups affiliated with Al Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb in Niger. The ammunition was linked to spectacular examples of state-sponsored violence and armed groups connected to terrorism — all without drawing wide attention or leading back to its manufacturer.

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TAGGED: Niger, Sudan, Uganda, Kenya, DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC of Congo, Ivory Coast, Africa, Iran

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