January 24, 2013

Asia's Other Spat: Japan vs. Russia

J. Berkshire Miller, The Diplomat

AP Photo

Earlier this month, former Japanese Prime Minister Yoshiro Mori appeared on national television and drew a line on the map separating Japan from Russia. Mori’s line was directly northeast of three of the disputed isles (Kunashiri, Shikotan and Habomai) but intentionally stopped short of including the largest island, Etorofu, which remained in Russian territory and signaled Mori’s desire to compromise with Russia. Mori justified this concession as a “realistic approach” to resolving the long standing territorial row between the two countries.

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TAGGED: Kuril Islands, Russia, Japan, Asia

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