January 31, 2013

Arab Spring's Hits and Misses

Fareed Zakaria, Washington Post

AP Photo

The chaos at the second anniversary of the Tahrir Square uprising is only the latest and most vivid illustration that the Egyptian revolution is going off the rails. It has revived talk about the failure of the Arab Spring and even some nostalgia for the old order. But Arab dictators such as Hosni Mubarak could not have held onto power without even greater troubles; look at Syria. Events in the Middle East the past two years underscore that constitutions are as vital as elections and that good leadership is crucial in these transitions.

Read Full Article ››

TAGGED: Middle East, Arab Spring, Morocco, Jordan, Egypt

RECOMMENDED ARTICLES

June 20, 2013
Why Mideast Monarchies Survive
Robert Kaplan, Stratfor
A startling fact has emerged from the Arab Spring that few have remarked upon: despite the pining for democracy by the Muslim masses, it's comparatively safe to be a king or sultan. Royal families have survived better in this age... more ››
June 20, 2013
Jordan: A Land Flowing with Syrian Refugees
Clifford May, NRO
The Zaatari refugee camp sprawls across the featureless, colorless desert of northern Jordan, six miles from the border with Syria, a country torn limb from limb by civil war. Among the camp’s 120,000 residents, the... more ››
June 19, 2013
What if Assad Wins?
J.L. Granatstein, Ottawa Citizen
What if Assad wins out in Syria? For months the rebellion against the Syrian president had made enormous headway, taking towns and villages, moving into Damascus, and creating the impression of an inevitable triumph. But now... more ››
June 20, 2013
Obama Fiddles While Mideast Burns
Walter Mead, American Interest
This administration appears to start from the assumption that the only really bad thing that can happen to the United States in the Middle East is that we can get sucked into its wars if we aren’t careful. It’s an... more ››