February 1, 2013

China: The People's Republic of Hacking

Adam Segal, Foreign Policy

AP Photo

In an extraordinary story that has become depressingly ordinary, the New York Times reports that Chinese hackers 'persistently' attacked the newspaper, "infiltrating its computer systems and getting passwords for its reporters and other employees." The attacks began around the time journalists were preparing a story on the massive wealth the family of China's Prime Minister Wen Jiabao has allegedly accumulated, but the methods, identification, and apparent objectives of the hackers have been seen before in previous attacks on defense contractors, technology companies, journalists, academics, think tanks, and NGOs.

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TAGGED: United States, New York Times, China, Cyberattacks

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