February 12, 2013

Too Soon to Judge Iraq War

Sarah Sands, London Evening Standard

AOL

Bush and Blair busted the Arab order, and we don’t yet know what the consequences are, good or bad. The fate of Iraq is still unknown. It was predictable when Saddam Hussein was in charge, because he had a monopoly on violence. We now have what Douglas Hurd once described in another context as a level killing field. It is volatile and the sacrifice has been great, but we should not rule out hope, simply in order to punish Tony Blair.

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TAGGED: Tony Blair, George W. Bush, Iraq

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