February 19, 2013

Is Putin as Reckless as North Korea?

Alexander Golts, Moscow Times

AP Photo

As I have written before, U.S. and Russian diplomats have little to say to one another these days. The problem is that PresidentVladimir Putinsincerely believes that Washington organized the mass protests in Moscow in late 2011 and early 2012 to carry out an Orange-like revolution. That conviction makes U.S.-Russian dialogue virtually impossible. After all, how can Putin cooperate on a serious level with a U.S. administration that he believes is planning his overthrow?

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TAGGED: North Korea, Russia, Vladimir Putin, START Treaty, Nuclear Weapons

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