December 9, 2013

France Is Repeatedly Failing in Africa

Richard Gowan, World Politics Review

The Associated Press

Is there a lonelier or more poorly understood warrior than Francois Hollande? Last week, as French troops prepared to intervene in the Central African Republic (CAR) to stem pervasive disorder, there was praise from abroad for the domestically unpopular French president. The Economist characterized Hollande as a “strident neocon” and “decisive war leader” whose willingness to send soldiers to Mali and the CAR this year has been in contrast to his “shaky” performance at home. Noting that France’s recent interventions have enjoyed widespread African support, the Guardian announced the emergence of a “Hollande doctrine” involving a “benign form of armed interventionism based on international authority and local consent.”

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TAGGED: Central African Republic, Francois Hollande, Africa, France

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