December 12, 2013

Iran's Hardliners, and Ours

Bill Keller, New York Times

The Associated Press

In the neocon bunkers of Washington, our hawks are distressed that the six-month deal, which includes broad goals for a long-range agreement, relaxes some of the economic sanctions that brought Iran to the bargaining table in the first place; in Tehran, the hard cases are furious that the most onerous sanctions on banking and oil exports remain in place. Iran’s hardliners hate the enrichment limits and stepped-up inspections aimed at freezing production of nuclear fuel while talks continue; our hard-liners are furious that we’ve agreed to accept any fuel enrichment at all.

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TAGGED: United States, Iran

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