December 18, 2013

How the Arab Spring Survived 2013

Noah Feldman, Bloomberg

The Associated Press

The overarching lesson of the last year is that bringing down regimes is much easier than building new, democratic ones. The next time established democracies face a democratic opening in a previously autocratic region, they shouldn’t blithely expect success to come naturally. Rather, they should actively provide incentives for success and consequences for failure.

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TAGGED: Syria, Egypt, Libya, Tunisia, Middle East, Arab Spring

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