December 23, 2013

India & U.S.: Divided by Democracy?

Devesh Kapur, Business Standard

The Associated Press

The sharp deterioration in India-US relations stemming from Devyani Khobragade's arrest raises a question: just how strong were the ties between the world's largest and oldest democracies - whose common value systems supposedly make them "natural allies" - that an incident involving a diplomat and a maid led to angst and anger threatening the relationship itself? Or had the relationship been weakening in the past few years, masked by the empty symbolism of state dinners?

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TAGGED: United States, India

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