December 25, 2013

Another Annus Horribilis for Francois Hollande?

James Shields, Global Public Square

The Associated Press

How long is France’s presidential term? Five years. How long has President François Hollande been in office? Twenty months. By the laws of simple arithmetic, that should leave him three years and four months – fully two-thirds of his mandate – to pursue his reform agenda at the head of his Socialist administration.

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TAGGED: European Union, Europe, France, Francois Hollande

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