December 30, 2013

2014: Is This Latin America's Big Year?

Alexa McMahon, The National Interest

The Associated Press

The 1980s were unkind to Latin America. Surging drug violence, economic turmoil, and a staggering debt crisis all led to our southern neighbors’ “lost decade”. Yet since the 2000s, things have been looking—and going—up. In fact, thanks to its strong economic growth and growing international influence, 2014 has the potential to be Latin America’s best year yet.

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TAGGED: Mexico, Latin America

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