January 3, 2014

The Right Answer to Turkey's Crisis

Amir Taheri, New York Post

The Associated Press

What a long time a year can be in politics. Twelve months ago, Turkey’s effervescent Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan seemed to be on top of the world, at least his world. He was putting final touches on a new constitution under which he’d be transformed into a president with executive powers at home and the spiritual authority of a Muslim Caliph abroad. Erdogan’s “neo-Ottoman dream” appeared to have succeeded enough for Turkish voters to give his Justice and Development Party (AKP) a lock on power for the foreseeable future.

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TAGGED: Recep Tayyip Erdogan, Turkey

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