January 4, 2014

How NAFTA Shafted Mexico

Mark Weisbrot, The Guardian

The Associated Press

It's tough to imagine Mexico doing worse without NAFTA. Perhaps this is part of the reason why Washington's proposed "Free Trade Area of the Americas" was roundly rejected by the region in 2005 and the proposed Trans-Pacific Partnership is running into trouble. Interestingly, when economists who have promoted NAFTA from the beginning are called upon to defend the agreement, the best that they can offer is that it increased trade. But trade is not, to most humans, an end in itself. And neither are the blatantly mis-named "free trade agreements".

Read Full Article ››

TAGGED: Global Economy, NAFTA, Mexico

RECOMMENDED ARTICLES

December 29, 2013
4 Global Stories You May Have Missed in 2013
Scoblete & Sullivan, GPS
There was no shortage of eye-grabbing global headlines in 2013. The Catholic Church chose a new Pope. China and Russia flexed their muscles. The U.S. and Iran, meanwhile, took a step back from the brink of what looked like a... more ››
December 23, 2013
You Need to Worry About the Global Economy
David Dapice, Yale Global
MEDFORD: As the year that saw the world's strongest economy brought to the precipice of a default comes to a close, and many wonder if 2014 promises more stability? Judging by most forecasts, including that of the International... more ››
January 1, 2014
What Will the Next 50 Years Be Like?
Paul Wolfowitz, The American
The world today is more secure, prosperous, and free than it was 50 years ago, but an effective Western alliance is vital if we're going to sustain that progress. more ››
December 31, 2013
A World Economy on the Brink of Fracture
Jeremy Warner, Telegraph
What will happen in 2014? The Chinese economy will slow; the price of oil will sink; Germany will slide into recession; the UK will remain intact and the internet will begin to Balkanise. more ››
January 2, 2014
Mexico's Revolution Has Begun
Frida Ghitis, World Politics Review
Few countries have claimed for themselves the mantle of revolution as frequently and as fervently as Mexico. Previous efforts brought change, even revolutionary change, but failed to lift large parts of the population out of... more ››