January 15, 2014

Why Is the West So Indifferent to Syria?

Sever Plocker, Ynet News

The Associated Press

The mass slaughter is taking place in the heart of the Arab world and just a stone's throw away from the progressive European-Western world. The silence of both of them, the Arab and European indifference to the mountains of bodies piling up in Syria's fields and on its cities' streets effectively eliminates their right to lecture anyone, anywhere around the globe.

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TAGGED: Europe, Syria

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