February 24, 2014

Why Russia Won't Interfere in Ukraine

Dmitri Trenin, New York Times

The Associated Press

Viktor F. Yanukovych of Ukraine and the Ukrainian opposition leaders signed an agreement on Friday that ended the deadly protests in Kiev by promising a new constitution and early elections. But the Russian president’s envoy to Kiev refused to co-sign it. While Moscow welcomed an end to the violence, it basically viewed the agreement as a diktat by the Western-backed Ukrainian opposition. The opposition has seized power in Kiev, and Moscow is wary that the crisis will not end anytime soon. Some radical groups remain well-armed; there are deep political, cultural and regional cleavages in Ukrainian society; the country’s elites are in disarray; and its economic situation is rapidly deteriorating. The mess is very much Ukraine’s own, and Russia has far less influence on...

Read Full Article ››

TAGGED: Vladimir Putin, Viktor Yanukovych, Ukraine, Russia

RECOMMENDED ARTICLES

CIVIL strife often follows a grimly predictable pattern. What at first seems a soluble dispute hardens into conflict, as goals become more radical, bitterness accumulates and the chance to broker a compromise is lost. Such has... more ››
February 24, 2014
Five Lessons from Ukraine's Revolution
Rajan Menon, RealClearWorld
Just when it seemed that Ukraine was lurching toward an all-out civil war that could have spilt the country between a Russophone east and south and a Europe-oriented center and west, feverish mediation by the foreign ministers of... more ››
February 12, 2014
Russia Begins to Lose Patience with Ukraine
Christian Neef, Der Spiegel
Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych got rid of his government, but seems unsure what to do next. The protests are spreading to the east and big brother Russia is demanding that calm be restored -- with violence if necessary. more ››
February 20, 2014
Viktor Yanukovych's Last Stand?
Gwynne Dyer, Toronto Star
What is happening in Ukraine is no longer a non-violent protest against a particular government policy. It is a revolution. more ››