March 7, 2014

Again, the Threat of Secession in Canada

Jeffrey Simpson, Globe and Mail

The Associated Press

If the Parti Quebecois wins a majority government in the April 7 election, as seems likely, a wild card will be thrown into federal politics. How to respond to the latest threat of Quebec secession will be an unavoidable issue for all federal parties. Which one will benefit remains unknown. What can be predicted with some certainty is the rest of Canada’s initial reaction to a PQ victory: annoyance mixed with boredom and intransigence. “Not this again” will be the widespread response.

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TAGGED: Quebec, Canada, Parti Quebecois, Pauline Marois

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