March 7, 2014

The Frank Underwood of Venezuela

Daniel Lansberg-Rodriguez, The Atlantic

The Associated Press

In recent weeks, Venezuela’s political crisis—mass protests in response to a flailing economy, rampant scarcities, soaring crime, and ideological polarization—has been portrayed in international media primarily as a struggle between a monolithic government and the embattled remnants of the nation’s traditional middle class. But this narrative is superficial; several storylines, both personal and social, are playing out below the surface. And these include a bitter clash between Hugo Chávez’s successor and almost-successor for the soul of his party and the future of the country.

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TAGGED: Diosdado Cabello, Nicolas Maduro, Venezuela

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