March 26, 2014

Is History Really Repeating in Crimea?

Frida Ghitis, Global Public Square

The Associated Press

History, as we know, echoes loudly in the present. Some version of what we see unfolding in Ukraine, and more specifically in the Crimean Peninsula, has occurred before. Indeed, today’s headlines recall countless events and bring to mind long-ago read chapters in history books; brittle, yellowed newspapers carefully preserved in libraries; and old black and white newsreels.

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TAGGED: Russia, Ukraine, Crimea

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