April 4, 2014

Crimea Crisis Gives New Life to NATO

Caleb Smith, RealClearHistory

The Associated Press

April 4 is the anniversary of the founding of an organization which has gained new life and significantly increased in importance in the wake of the recent crisis in Crimea. Sixty-five years ago, on April 4, 1949, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization was chartered in Washington, D.C. When WWII ended, and the nations of Western Europe faced a new threat on their borders – the Soviet Union – they realized the need for a new, more comprehensive treaty to stave off the new threat, a treaty that would span the Atlantic and bring in the United States.

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TAGGED: North Atlantic Treaty Organization, NATO, Russia, Ukraine, Crimea

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